An independent charity: for science and integrity in healthcare

The 2017 HealthWatch student prize competition for critical appraisal of clinical research protocols is now open.

There are two first prizes of £500 each, one for medical and dental students and one for students of nursing, midwifery and professions allied to medicine. Up to 5 runner-up prizes of £100 will be awarded in each class. Prize winners will be invited to attend the HealthWatch Annual General Meeting in October to receive their prizes.

The competition consists of four hypothetical research protocols: your task is to rank the protocols in order from that most likely to provide a reliable answer to the stated aims of the trial to that least likely to do so. You then have to explain your ranking in no more than 600 words.

Please pass on to any students, organisations, colleges, universities, etc you think might be interested.

Entries must be received by 30 June 2017.

Find out more here.

Members, friends, supporters and interested readers - the deadline for the Spring issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter will soon be here.

As of this year the HealthWatch Newsletter in pdf format is openly accessible online immediately on publication so that our contributors can benefit from as wide an audience as possible, and may share their work freely.

For our Spring issue it would be great to have material from some new contributors. Opinions, book reviews, an insider's take on a news story perhaps ...

Please send your articles by Monday 20th March for target publication date during April. For more information and details of how to submit please see our Information for Authors page.

As part of our vision for taking HealthWatch forward, we plan to concentrate our efforts on two or three projects or areas of investigation in depth. This could involve research, investigation, taking part in consultation ... anything that will forward HealthWatch's aims of promoting integrity in healthcare. Projects currently under way or completed have included the highlighting of concerns over Public Health England's age extension trial of mammography screening, the student experience of CAM teaching in medical schools1 and two investigations into the efficacy of the Consumer Protection Regulations as applied to health claims (one published2 and one in the final stages of data analysis).

Among HealthWatch members and committee there is a vast pool of skills, experience and enthusiasm. We know that we have many supporters who would like the opportunity to get more directly involved. So let's have your ideas! Please complete our very short Focus questionnaire to suggest areas that you think we should investigate. Just click here.

References

1. Ho D et al. Focus Altern Complement Ther 2013;18(4):176–81 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/fct.12059/abstract

2. Rose LB et al. Med Leg J 2012;80(1):13–8 http://dx.doi.org/10.1258/mlj.2011.011034 

The Winter 2016-17 issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter is now online - in full! The HealthWatch Newsletter is now free to read and download.

Features in this issue:

  • NEWS FEATURE Are the WHO guilty of woo? An out-of-date World Health Organization report is being widely cited as evidence for the efficacy of needling, and Australia’s award-winning Loretta Marron calls on the WHO to set the record straight for the sake of the poorest and most vulnerable.
  • HEALTHWATCH AWARD WINNER Peter Gotzsche is tired of being labelled controversial – the Cochrane scientist and author who compares big pharma to organized crime just wants to tell the truth about medicine. He pulls no punches in his talk to the HealthWatch AGM, reported here.
  • BOOK REVIEW broadcaster and journalist Nick Ross shares a taste of Edzard Ernst’s new book on homeopathy
  • plus Chairman's report from latest AGM, Student Prizewinners and news updates

Join us by becoming a member of HealthWatch and a supporter of science and integrity in healthcare. HealthWatch members will continue to receive their personal printed copy of the newsletter if they have opted to do so.

Notes to Editors:

HealthWatch is the charity that has been promoting science and integrity in healthcare since 1991.

Further information from: www.healthwatch-uk.org

Media enquiries: our press office is manned continually, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or via the media contact form online.

HealthWatch has no connection with “Healthwatch England”.

There could soon be an end to compulsory mammography screening of women in Uruguay, thanks to one woman’s battle.

A bill presented at the Congress on Thursday, 1st December aims to ensure that women are asked for their informed consent to undergo screening for breast cancer and are not penalised if they refuse the test.

The news is the latest in a long-running campaign by Ana Rosengurtt, a 55-year-old computer engineer. Earlier this year she won a 4-year legal battle for the right to be excluded from the compulsory test. A Montevideo court found that the government had neglected its obligation to obtain patients’ informed consent. But Ana’s victory this summer applied to her only. The new law, if adopted, will give the same freedom to all Uruguayan women.

Until the new law is passed, though, Uruguayan working women aged 50-69* will continue to be compelled by law to undergo mammography screening for breast cancer every 2 years, to qualify for the “carné de salud” (health card) that permits them to work, hold a driver’s licence, study at university. Women will still have to submit to compulsory PAP smear, blood and urine tests every two years. Uruguay has the highest cancer mortality in Latin America, and the 10th highest worldwide according to the WHO. Screening has been compulsory since 2006 and the policy is largely accepted, as awareness of the possible risks is low.

Ana says, "Thank you very much to all of you who had supported my fight all these years.

"Now the law will be discussed at the congress. I expect a swift approval as it is based on a ruling by the court. So, the ruling that initially applied only to me, will be a law for every woman soon. Not only justice, also congress will have endorsed my right."

Mammography screening for breast cancer has questionable benefits and considerable harms. HealthWatch believes it is unethical to impose screening without the woman’s informed consent.

*the age range changed this year, previously it was 40-59.

For more information:
 
BMJ, 8 Dec 2016

Montevideo Portal, 30 Nov 2016

The Congress website shows the registration of the bill (labelled “606/0”)

(For articles in Spanish - if using Chrome browser, right-click on the text to have the article translated into English)

Scientific American, 17 Oct 2015

BMJ, 21 Mar 2013

The highlights of the Autumn 2016 issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter are now online! In our Highlights you can read our news stories in full, plus tasters of the features:

  • NEWS Breast screening victory in Uruguay, and more news on science and integrity from home and abroad
  • NEWS FEATURE Les Rose has exposed charities that promote unproven and useless remedies to the sick and vulnerable. This is the latest on his public campaign, and – finally – news of possible action from the Charities Commission
  • ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS Evidence needed! For effective therapies for disabled children. Christopher Morris from PenCRU on a resource that promotes quality information for affected families
  • MEDIA Is “balance” always necessary in news reporting? An extract from the latest book by awardwinning author and journalist John Illman
  • MEETING REPORT Students are the future of HealthWatch. John Kirwan and Debra Bick on the inspiration generated by our healthcare student workshop

The full text, published version of the HealthWatch Newsletter is available to HealthWatch members only, who receive it direct by e-mail or post as requested. Join us by becoming a member of HealthWatch and a supporter of science and integrity in medicine.

All HealthWatch newsletter content becomes fully open access 12 months after original publication – in the most recent open access issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter (Autumn 2015) you can now read Colin Brewer’s thoughtful feature on the government’s plans to reduce suicides; nutrition expert David Bender on internet promises of eternal youth; and Nick Ross presents a controversial view on medical confidentiality.

Notes to Editors:
HealthWatch is the charity that has been promoting science and integrity in medicine since 1991
Media enquiries: please contact our press office, which is manned continually, using the media contact form
Further information from: www.healthwatch-uk.org
HealthWatch has no connection with the organisation “Healthwatch England”

Journalists often ask Peter Gøtzsche why he’s always looking for controversy. “I tell them, I'm not. It comes looking for me,” he replies. The Danish physician, medical researcher and leader of the Nordic Cochrane Centre received the 2016 HealthWatch Award at the charity's 28th Annual General Meeting with a compelling presentation titled: ‘Is it controversial to tell the truth about health care?’

“If I see something that seems to me wrong, I dig very deep to find the truth. I expose skeletons and sometimes the people who buried them can get very angry,” he said. This fearlessly outspoken defender of integrity in medicine went on to talk of biased trials, regulatory processes compromised by conflicts of interest, dangers of psychiatric drugs, and the folly of government investment in health checks and screening tests that simply don't work. A report of his talk will appear in the Winter issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter.

GoetzscheRossPrize2Here, Peter Gøtzsche (left) receives his award from HealthWatch's President - the journalist, author and broadcaster Nick Ross (right) (Photo: Mandy Payne)

The HealthWatch Award is presented annually to an individual who has made significant steps either in medical research or in improving the public’s understanding of health issues by clarifying complicated and often misunderstood medical matters for the general public. Peter Gøtzsche qualifies on both counts - through his painstaking meta-analyses of drug data and also for his very readable books including Mammography Screening: Truth, Lies and Controversy and Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare.

He became the award's 24th recipient at the 2016 Annual General Meeting of HealthWatch on Thursday 20th October 2016 at the Medical Society of London.

Media enquiries: please contact our press office using the media contact form which is monitored continually.

Note to Editors: HealthWatch, a registered charity established in 1991, promotes science and integrity in medicine: the assessment and testing of all medical and nutritional treatments, products and procedures; consumer protection in regard to all forms of health care; the highest standards of education and evidence-based health care by practitioners; better understanding by the public and the media of the importance of application of evidence from robust clinical trials. Further information from www.healthwatch-uk.org (n.b. HealthWatch has no connection with the organisation “Healthwatch England”).

We are honoured to host a short celebration of the life of John Garrow in London on Thursday 20th October. An eminent medical nutritionist with a passion for evidence, Professor Garrow was a founding member of the charity HealthWatch which promotes science and integrity in medicine. He was several-times chairman of HealthWatch and a man who fought for evidence with passion and style.

Following his death in June this year, his family have kindly agreed to hold this memorial toast before the HealthWatch Annual General Meeting. His friends and colleagues from all spheres of his life (not just HealthWatch) are warmly invited to attend.

Please join us with the Garrow family to toast the life of John Garrow at 5:30pm on Thursday 20th October 2016 at the Medical Society of London, 11 Chandos Street, Cavendish Square, London W1G 9EB (nearest Underground stations are Bond St or Oxford Circus). To help us with preparations, please confirm your attendance by registering here.

There is no compulsion to remain for the 28th Annual General Meeting of HealthWatch which begins shortly afterwards, although you are most welcome if you wish to do so. The evening will include presentation of awards to winners of the HealthWatch Student Competition, of which John Garrow was a generous supporter, and to the fearlessly outspoken Cochrane scientist Dr Peter Gøtzsche, a choice of whom he would surely have approved. There is more information about the AGM and other HealthWatch events planned for the day here.

There is never enough time at the HealthWatch Annual General Meeting for members to discuss what they want to achieve, and how they can help to forward our aims. So this time we’ve arranged a proper workshop, which we’ve named “Whither HealthWatch?” to take place on the afternoon of the HealthWatch AGM. Aim? To review the aims and activities of HealthWatch, and help to generate a new vision for our charity’s future.

The programme will start with brief introductions to five areas of activity and what HealthWatch can do: to debunk myths; for student outreach; to influence public policy; to go forward with our publications; to influence clinical practice. We will then break up into separate groups to discuss these areas of activity, and after tea each group will report back to the meeting as a whole, followed by discussion of what should be our priorities.

“Whither HealthWatch?” will run from at 2:30pm until 5:00pm on Thursday 20th October 2016 at the Medical Society of London, 11 Chandos Street, Cavendish Square, London W1G 9EB (nearest Underground stations are Bond St or Oxford Circus). Members, friends and supporters of HealthWatch may take part. Places are limited, apply for yours here.

All are most welcome to remain for the 28th Annual General Meeting of HealthWatch which begins shortly afterwards. More information about the other HealthWatch events planned for the day can be found here.

Peter Gøtzsche needs no introduction to those who share the aims of HealthWatch. The Danish physician, medical researcher and leader of the Nordic Cochrane Centre will receive the 2016 HealthWatch Award at the 28th HealthWatch Annual General Meeting.

Gøtzsche, who helped found the Cochrane Collaboration for independent, quality evidence in medicine, is a fearlessly outspoken defender of integrity in medicine. 

He has controversially and powerfully argued that there is no justification for the use of mammography to screen for breast cancer. His many publications include his 2012 book Mammography Screening: Truth, Lies and Controversy and, the following year, Deadly Medicines and Organised Crime: How Big Pharma has Corrupted Healthcare - a searing exposé of industry bias in clinical trials. He has revealed data errors in meta-analyses, harms in psychiatric drugs, questioned the editorial independence of medical journals, and highlighted medical ghostwriting as scientific misconduct. His research includes the finding that placebo has surprisingly little effect.

The 28th Annual General meeting of HealthWatch will be held on Thursday 20th October 2016 at the Medical Society of London, 11 Chandos Street, Cavendish Square, London W1G 9EB (nearest Underground stations are Bond St or Oxford Circus). As usual, the meeting is free and open to all, although only members may vote. There is more information about this and other HealthWatch events planned for AGM day here.

 

The highlights of the Summer 2016 issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter are now online! In this issue:

  • Dr Roger Fisken alerted the MHRA to a device making impossible medical claims. But is his complaint being investigated or ignored? His case raises questions about lack of transparency of the work of this public body (full text)
  • John Illman, winner of a 2016 Medical Journalists’ Association award, explains why anecdotes in the media are so much more powerful than statistics (intro only)
  • A tribute to the recently-late John Garrow, professor of human nutrition, leading obesity expert, and a passionate campaigner for evidence (full text)
    Can foods really boost the immune system? David Bender examines the claims and finds some truths, and some whoppers! (intro only)
  • News of the 2016 HealthWatch Debate which addressed the motion: “This house believes sugar is harmful so all sugary foods should be taxed, not just soft drinks” (intro only)
  • The secrets of complementary and alternative are revealed—by magician Richard Rawlins; and the memoirs of Beulah Bewley, an inspirational woman who qualified as a doctor in the 1950’s and went on to become a Dame of the British Empire for services to women doctors (intro only)
  • Medical journalist and author Caroline Richmond celebrates the continuing fall in homeopathy prescriptions (intro only)

The full text, published version of the HealthWatch Newsletter with all of these articles is available to HealthWatch members only. Join us by becoming a member of HealthWatch and a supporter of science and integrity in medicine. Non-members can read the highlights of this latest newsletter including two open access features, here. All HealthWatch newsletter content becomes fully open access 12 months after original publication.

Media enquiries: please contact our PRESS OFFICE using the media contact form or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Note to Editors:
HealthWatch, a registered charity established in 1991, promotes science and integrity in medicine: the assessment and testing of all medical and nutritional treatments, products and procedures; consumer protection in regard to all forms of health care; the highest standards of education and evidence-based health care by practitioners; better understanding by the public and the media of the importance of application of evidence from robust clinical trials. Further information from: www.healthwatch-uk.org (n.b. HealthWatch has no connection with the organisation “Healthwatch England”).

In the latest issue of the HealthWatch Newsletter, we find out why the government's targets for reducing stillbirths are likely to fail, we learn what it was about the 1990s that made CAM so popular, and we are appalled at the possibilities for promoting misinformation in the scientific literature. And if you thought you knew about why spinach is so good for you, think again ...

The full text of the HealthWatch Newsletter with all of these articles is available to HealthWatch members only. Join us by becoming a member of HealthWatch and a supporter of science and integrity in medicine. Non-members can read the highlights of this latest newsletter online here and one open access feature "The Unbearable Asymmetry of Bullshit" by Brian Earp, here. All HealthWatch newsletters become fully open access 12 months after original publication.

This year’s HealthWatch debate has seized another hot topic and some brilliant speakers.

This year we’re delighted to welcome back our patron the evidence-based comedian Robin Ince as chairman while our four distinguished experts debate the motion “This house believes sugar is harmful so all sugary foods should be taxed, not just soft drinks”. Audience members will be asked to vote on the proposition both before and after the debate.

Panel members:

-          Dr Aseem Malhotra, Honorary Consultant Cardiologist, Lister Hospital Stevenage, and Advisor to the National Obesity Forum

-          Professor Richard Tiffin, Professor of Applied Economics, University of Reading

-          David A Bender, Emeritus Professor of Nutritional Biochemistry, University College London

-          Dr Carwyn Rhys Hooper, Institute of Medical and Biomedical Education, St George's, University of London

Attendance is free. To guarantee your place register here.

When: Monday, 23 May 2016 from 18:30 to 20:30 (BST)

Where: King's College Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing & Midwifery - Waterloo Campus Frankin-Wilkins Building, 150 Stamford Street, SE1 9NH - View Map

The 2016 HealthWatch student prize competition for critical appraisal of clinical research protocols is now open.

There are two first prizes of £500 each, one for medical and dental students and one for students of nursing, midwifery and professions allied to medicine. Up to 5 runner-up prizes of £100 will be awarded in each class. Prize winners will be invited to attend the HealthWatch Annual General Meeting in October to receive their prizes.

The competition consists of four hypothetical research protocols: your task is to rank the protocols in order from that most likely to provide a reliable answer to the stated aims of the trial to that least likely to do so. You then have to explain your ranking in no more than 600 words.

Find out more here.

Entries must be received by 30 June 2016.

In Uruguay working women aged 50-69* are compelled by law to undergo mammography screening for breast cancer every 2 years.
Without it they can’t get a health card that gives them many of their basic human rights – to work, hold a driver’s licence, study at university, and even to join a gym. As far as we know, it’s the only country in the world where this type of screening test is mandatory. Find out more in this recent article in Scientific American and in the BMJ, here.
Screening for breast cancer has questionable benefits and considerable harms. HealthWatch believes it is unethical to impose screening without the woman’s informed consent. A petition calling for an end to mandatory screening is available (to translate the Spanish text to English use Google Chrome browser and right click on the text).
*the age range has changed in recent weeks, previously 40-59.

Dr Mark Porter jostles for space with Nick Ross, Michael Baum, Edzard Ernst, and Leonore Tiefer's shocking report on a new sex drug, in this winter’s issue of the HealthWatch newletter, out now.

Mark Porter of BBC Radio 4’s “Inside Health” is on the front page talking about the hazards of guidelines in clinical practice. “The evidence we’re looking at is not always pertinent to the people we’re treating,” he says. “External pressures mean that guidelines get rigidly applied. They become tramlines. And I think that’s a problem.” Mark Porter was speaking on accepting the 23rd annual HealthWatch Award at the HealthWatch Annual General Meeting, 20 October 2015 at the Medical Society of London.

On the subject of sex, the hunt for the “pink Viagra” resulted last year in the US FDA’s approval of flibanserin (“AddyiTM”), a drug with very limited benefits for women and considerable drawbacks. How did this happen? Our guest feature from Professor Leonore Tiefer, award-winning US clinical psychologist, tells how the little pink pill went from feminist issue to billionaire-maker to damp squib in a matter of weeks. Journalist and broadcaster Nick Ross celebrates the career of Edzard Ernst, joint winner of this year’s John Maddox prize for standing up for science. Celebrated breast cancer surgeon Michael Baum reports with enthusiasm on his meeting with a like-minded group in the Netherlands recently; news and pictures of our latest student prize-winners; and a run-down of HealthWatch’s achievements during the past year is on page 3.

The full text of the HealthWatch Newsletter with all of these articles is available to HealthWatch members only. Join us by becoming a member of HealthWatch and a supporter of science and integrity in medicine. Non-members can read the highlights of this latest newsletter online here. All HealthWatch newsletters become fully open access 12 months after original publication.

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